Retail Categories

US click-and-collect sales more than doubled in 2020 and will sustain double-digit growth rates over the next four years, according to our latest forecast. We estimate that US shoppers spent $72.46 billion via click and collect last year, accounting for 9.1% of all ecommerce sales. This year, those figures will increase to $83.47 billion and 9.9%, respectively.

On today's episode, we discuss how stores will likely shape-shift, what happens to curbside pickup going forward, and how "virtual" shopping experiences are about to get. We then talk about whether "buy now, pay later" is sticking around, Amazon's emerging national grocery chain, and how Walmart+ is doing six months after launch. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer director of forecasting Cindy Liu and analyst at Insider Intelligence Daniel Keyes.

Learn how digitally native brand Mack Weldon repositioned its product-based messaging in favor of compassionate campaigns told through consumers’ voices. See our interview with Brian Berger, founder and CEO, as he discusses marketing strategies, brand loyalty, and the importance of testing traditional and nontraditional channels.

US click-and-collect sales more than doubled in 2020 and will sustain double-digit growth rates over the next four years. We forecast that click-and-collect sales will follow up last year’s 106.9% growth rate with a 15.2% increase this year, and that 150.4 million people in the US will make a purchase via click and collect at least once in 2021.

For shoe retailer DSW, TikTok is a place to test, learn, and have fun. In this excerpt from our new report, "Marketing in the Short-Video Landscape," Maria Wollenburg, DSW’s manager of social media and content, shares what the company has done on the social platform and what was learned in the eight months since launching its first TikTok paid ad campaign.

As Dickies nears its 100th birthday, Kathy Hines, vice president of global marketing, speaks about the importance of taking a deep introspective look at your brand. She discusses how Dickies went to market with its “United by Inspiration, United by Dickies" campaign and honest, authentic global messaging with a localized approach. As a business leader, Kathy also offers advice to women as we continue celebrating Women’s History Month with Industry Voices.

Against a backdrop of turmoil in 2020, the retail industry overall is set for growth in 2021. With digital transformation efforts accelerating under urgent conditions, investments in digital infrastructure should grow this year. And as 5G networks are finally starting to take off, the technology could bring about positive changes for retail in the near and long terms.

The dominant digital path to purchase begins with a product search—often unbranded—during which the consumer demonstrates intent. They are subsequently delivered paid and organic results for relevant brands and retailers, steering them in the direction of a conversion event. But what about all those times when a consumer doesn’t know what they want? That’s the opportunity for discovery, and where social commerce platforms are beginning to fill the void.

A new paradigm of physical retail, created and accelerated by the pandemic’s disruptive forces, is ready to emerge. In the coming year, the “retail apocalypse” will reach a crescendo as many teetering legacy retailers close hundreds of locations. In their place, frictionless, digitally enabled retail experiences will dot the landscape.

Link Walls, vice president of digital marketing strategy at ChannelAdvisor, talks with Rimma Kats, executive editor at eMarketer, about how marketers should reevaluate retail media, ads on Amazon, and data privacy.

Even before the pandemic, the direct-to-consumer (D2C) space was heating up in Western Europe. But the side effects of stay-at-home orders helped accelerate D2C’s popularity, and the landscape looks to be permanently altered.

Now, increasing restrictions on data collection, changes to Apple’s Identifier for Advertisers (IDFA), and the death of the third-party cookie will mean that winning brands must reduce their dependence on third parties, and place a greater focus on first-party data and owned channels. In short, they’ll need more direct-to-consumer (D2C) marketing, and less (though still plenty) advertising.