Media Buying

US banking digital ad spend will hit $13.54 billion in 2022, up 20.4% year over year. Growth was even faster in 2021, when banks anticipated an upswing in consumer spend. In the coming years, growth will decelerate but remain in the double digits.

US digital retail media ad spending will reach $61.15 billion by the end of our forecast period in 2024. This is nearly triple the 2020 figure of $20.81 billion and represents a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 30.9% in that four-year span.

Roblox isn’t growing: The young-skewing gaming/metaverse platform reported lower net bookings than Q2 2021.

Even as it contracts, Snap looks to the future: The company is planning layoffs but has major long-term ambitions.

Sports betting’s ad cooldown won’t be permanent: A year of hefty spending might have DraftKings slowing down, but sports will persist through a recession.

Among US companies investing in digital video advertising, the share that did so exclusively on YouTube increased from 47% in Q4 2021 to 60% in Q1 2022, for a total of roughly 9,300 companies in the US.

Google looks to boost transparency around programmatic advertising: Its move comes as our forecast shows spending on these ads will rise steadily through 2024.

Ditching Netflix to pay for groceries: Consumers in the US and UK show a willingness to cut back on media and retail subscriptions as the cost of living skyrockets.

On today's episode, we discuss where young folks are searching instead of Google, what to make of the company's Q2 earnings, and the significance of YouTube's growth slamming on the brakes. "In Other News," we talk about the most interesting part of programmatic advertising and why Google is delaying the deprecation of third-party cookies again. Tune in to the discussion with our analyst Evelyn Mitchell.

The US advertising market is being dragged by the ear into a new, more privacy-focused era. Thanks to regulatory scrutiny in Europe and the US, the market’s largest players—particularly Google and Apple—are making it harder for third-party firms to surveil the browsing behavior of internet users, chiefly by ending support for third-party identifiers and requiring users to consent to being tracked online.

The New York Times feels the ad downturn: That’s bad news for other digital publishers who have started layoffs and seen ad dollars plummet.

On today's episode, we discuss how much of an effect Elon Musk has had on Twitter's recent performance, how advertisers are now viewing the company, and what initiatives the social media platform will likely consider moving forward. "In Other News," we talk about how bots and spam influence advertising and whether shorter ads on social media are the way to go. Tune in to the discussion with our analyst Jasmine Enberg.

As Apple’s ad business expands, ATT’s reputation suffers: The mobile ad industry is reeling from the change, while Apple’s services unit grows ever larger.

Big Tech earnings reveal economic uncertainty: Consumer spending is down while costs are up and supply chain woes continue to drag down profits. Big Tech is bracing for tough times.

CTV spend will see a downturn after Roku’s Q2: Months of macroeconomic pains and murky CTV credibility hurt the sector’s ad spend.

The TikTok train continues to gather steam, with growing user numbers, engagement rates, and ad revenues. But UK marketers have a lot to consider when marketing on TikTok—where catching the eye of users is an entirely different proposition than it is on other social platforms.

Google’s Q2 results are a mixed bag: Although expenses grew at a faster rate than revenue, its search advertising business could be stealing advertisers from social platforms like Meta.

One of the most common buzzwords in programmatic is transparency. It’s little wonder why—programmatic advertising involves a lot of moving parts and evolves quickly and constantly.

Netflix recently announced it's set to introduce an ad-supported tier. But what’s the lay of the ad-supported video-on-demand (AVOD) land in markets around the world? Join our analyst Bill Fisher as he hosts analysts Paul Briggs and Matteo Ceurvels to discuss a few of the markets Netflix is looking to disrupt.

Elon Musk doesn’t own Twitter, but he partially owns its Q2 results: The Tesla CEO has been a headwind factoring into the platform's weak Q2 results.