Retail & Ecommerce

Mobile payments have proven their value during the pandemic as a way to limit our risk to exposure instead of paying with cash or card. Last year, per our estimates, smartphone usage in the US surged to an average of 182 minutes daily (from 154 minutes pre-pandemic), which extended to payments.

The customer experience landscape has changed dramatically over the last year as pandemic-induced lockdowns and social distancing pushed many consumers to try new technologies and experiences, such as click and collect, proximity payments, and augmented reality.

The buy now, pay later firm saw record-breaking volume driven by significant US growth and is positioning itself to keep up this momentum through international expansion and new retail partnerships.

On today's episode, we discuss what the world will look like in 2030. Who will be the digital ad giants, how much shopping will we do online, will bank branches disappear, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer vice president of forecasting Monica Peart, senior director of forecasting Shelleen Shum, and directors of forecasting at Insider Intelligence Cindy Liu and Oscar Orozco.

The past year has been a whirlwind for many brands as they readjusted their marketing efforts to keep up with the changing landscape. One such brand, direct-to-consumer (D2C) company Peace Out Skincare, learned to be more nimble as it navigated a then-emerging platform—TikTok—and the Gen Z customers it caters to.

Even before the pandemic, ecommerce channel advertising was attracting a lot of attention from advertisers—especially in verticals like consumer packaged goods (CPG)—as well as retailers, which hoped to add new higher-margin revenue streams to their businesses after seeing Amazon’s success in the area. Amazon had become the No. 3 digital ad seller in the US thanks primarily to placements on its ecommerce property, and companies including Walmart, Target, and eBay had been growing similar businesses.

Amazon’s flagship sales event is reportedly scheduled for June despite historically taking place in July—and being delayed to October in 2020—in a bid to maximize the event’s performance.

On today's episode, we discuss how concerned we should be about Netflix's slow start to the year, which activities people will do at home versus in-person (if both were safe and possible), how TikTok can convince people to buy things on its platform, details about a Twitter Blue subscription service, whether a travel recovery already happened, some interesting facts about 'Forrest Gump,' and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer director of forecasting Oscar Orozco, forecasting analyst Peter Vahle, and analyst at Insider Intelligence Blake Droesch.

Washington’s attorney general filed a complaint regarding Amazon’s pricing policy for third-party sellers, potentially opening the door for other platforms to compete with Amazon’s prices.

On today's episode, we discuss whether a federal privacy law is still expected this year, some case studies of how companies are building trust in emerging technologies through privacy, and some best practices on how to differentiate on privacy. We then talk about major retailers' Q1 earnings, why Google is opening a brick-and-mortar store, and whether kids being able to shop online by themselves will catch on. Tune in to the discussion with Insider Intelligence senior analyst Sara M. Watson and analyst Daniel Keyes.

Apple and PayPal hinted at future plans for crypto payments, but concerns surrounding regulations and crypto’s volatility could dampen development.

Amazon's antitrust debut: DC's lawsuit marks the company's first formal complaint by the US government—but with several probes ongoing and with Amazon continuing its rapid expansion, more suits are certain to come soon.

An iOS app update reportedly contains language about two forthcoming bank accounts from Square—which, if true, put it ahead of the competition.

Creators have never been hotter: Social platforms want them, and marketers want to work with them. The creator economy is offering up new or improved opportunities for creators to make money outside of brand partnerships. So, where does that leave brands?

Travel's on the up: With US adults' demand for domestic travel on the rise, prices are following. But there are still a few ways for marketers to capture that demand among price-conscious travelers.

On today's episode, we discuss why Uber is trying to be a one-stop shop and how DoorDash outperformed Uber during the pandemic. We then talk about The New York Times' Q1 subscriber and revenue performance, NBCUniversal's thoughts on regional sports, and what stood out at this year's NewFronts. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer senior forecasting analyst at Insider Intelligence Eric Haggstrom.

For some time now, consumers have been moving toward demanding more frictionless payment methods across online and offline channels. The social distancing and sanitizing practices brought on by the pandemic proved to be the push that encouraged many consumers to try proximity mobile payments (paying for goods using a mobile phone as a physical POS) for the first time. Ecommerce retailers, not to be outdone, are finding ways to improve their transactions as well.

A BitPay study found US consumers are increasingly interested in making purchases with cryptos, creating a growth opportunity for payment providers in the space.