Video

Content edits aren’t off limits for brand safety: Disney+ has removed several controversial scenes and lines from content as it ramps up its ad launch.

Rising costs and economic uncertainty are contributing to a reconsideration of streaming’s future. Streaming services are under pressure to attract consumers and retain them, all while inching toward profitability.

Netflix is playing catchup with its younger competitors: The platform began building livestream capabilities while competitors launch completed products.

Netflix speeds up its ad rollout, but uncertainty still swirls: An internal note shows Netflix preempting concerns that rushed ads could harm its brand.

Advertisers and platforms identify Hispanic media as a growth opportunity: TelevisaUnivision, NBCUniversal, and Canela are among the players looking to strengthen their relationships with this demographic group.

The recent influx of premium streaming services is changing the way people access movies and TV shows. In the US, 18% of US paid video subscribers purchase just one streaming service, down 17 percentage points from 2019. By contrast, 35% currently pay for four or more services, up 24 percentage points from three years ago.

On today's episode, we discuss what to make of Google's Q1 and what is behind YouTube's slowing growth. "In Other News," expect to learn about the future of the video streaming bundle and what kind of an impact the newly formed Warner Bros. Discovery can have on the media world. Tune in to the discussion with our analyst Paul Verna.

Apple’s shift away from tech doesn’t come at the expense of its brand: Once known for its sleek hardware, Apple is now focusing on media.

Almost one-quarter of US adult Netflix users aren’t paying to use the platform. The majority, or 63%, pay full cost, while 14% share the fee with other users. Netflix’s challenge is to figure out how to get freeloaders to pay their dues.

NBCU is searching for new standards in video advertising: The network is challenging competitors and bringing new solutions across the fragmented industry.

India is the next battleground in the streaming wars: Amazon Prime Video, Disney, and Netflix are fighting for dominance in the growing streaming market.

On today's episode, we discuss what to make of Netflix's user declines and whether adding commercials can help them. "In Other News," we talk about why CNN+ has already shut down. Tune in to the discussion with our analysts Ross Benes and Daniel Konstantinovic.

Prime Video bets content will draw international viewers: Amazon’s streaming service is investing to create regional shows in Europe and Asia.

Among US Netflix subscribers who share their account with others, nearly half said they’d very likely cancel their subscription if the platform began charging them extra for sharing it. An additional 28% said they’d be somewhat likely to delete their accounts, while just 27% say they would stay subscribed.

This year, Peacock will hit 64.3 million US viewers, up 25.0% from 51.5 million the year before. The Comcast-owned streaming platform will continue to grow as it rivals established competitors.

Netflix is the final domino to fall in streaming’s advertising pivot: The company’s shocking loss of 200,000 subscribers means big changes are coming.

Subscriber flight costs Netflix $50 billion in value: Streaming giant suffers worst loss in over a decade and risks losing more users by spending less on original content, charging more for shared passwords, and introducing ad-supported tiers.

Despite the stagnation of the traditional TV market, US TV screen advertising will grow by over $14 billion in the next four years. Viewing patterns are shifting toward digital as more Americans continue to cut the cord and move to connected TVs and streaming services.

On today's episode, we discuss how public service broadcasters can compete with the global streaming behemoths, how ad-free digital video options are disrupting things for marketers, and what the connected TV advertising landscape looks like. Join our analyst Bill Fisher as he hosts analysts Karin von Abrams and Paul Briggs.

YouTube’s MLB deal is a reminder of its streaming power: A whirlwind of streaming news has mostly left YouTube out of the picture, but its dominance can’t be ignored.