• The world’s leading companies rely on Insider Intelligence’s vetted data and actionable takeaways to make informed business decisions in a rapidly expanding digital ecosystem.
  • AP, CBS News, and Modern Retail are just a few examples of the companies that featured Insider Intelligence research this past week.

AP: Whistleblower: China, India had agents working for Twitter

The question of whether Twitter is accurately counting its active users, an important metric for its advertisers, did not come up in the hearing. Elon Musk, who is trying to get out of a $44 billion deal to buy Twitter, has argued without evidence that many of Twitter’s roughly 238 million daily users are fraudulent accounts. 

Even so, “that doesn’t mean that Musk won’t use Zatko’s allegation that Twitter was disinterested in removing bots to try to bolster his argument for walking away from the deal,” said Insider Intelligence analyst Jasmine Enberg.

Zatko’s allegation that Twitter was more concerned about foreign regulators than the FTC, Enberg said, “could be a wakeup call for U.S. lawmakers,” who have been unable to pass meaningful regulation on social media companies.

Twitter has been accused of not addressing spam bots on its platform. - Unsplash
Twitter has been accused of not addressing spam bots on its platform. Unsplash

CBS News: California sues Amazon, alleging its dominance pushes up prices

“Seattle-based Amazon controls roughly 38% of online sales in the U.S., more than that of Walmart, eBay, Apple, Best Buy and Target combined,” according to the research firm Insider Intelligence.

California blames Amazon for the high prices in online shopping. - Unsplash
California blames Amazon for the high prices in online shopping. Unsplash

ModernRetail: Move over, department stores: Specialty grocers are taking over as mall anchors

“Having a grocery store in a mall doesn’t always mean higher traffic for other stores in the area, said Blake Droesch, senior analyst at market research firm Insider Intelligence. “People who shop for groceries versus those who shop for other goods, like apparel, exhibit different shopping behaviors. Because of the perishable items purchased at grocery stores, some people might opt to go home after their grocery trip rather than further explore the mall.”

“The assumption that bringing a high foot traffic retailer like a grocery store is automatically going to spill foot traffic over into other retailers in the mall is certainly not a guarantee,” said Droesch. There are “just different types of consumer buying patterns that occur and [it’s] going to be hard to marry those two experiences.”

High foot traffic in grocery stores does not guarantee this will spill over into other retailers in the area. - Unsplash
High foot traffic in grocery stores does not guarantee this will spill over into other retailers in the area. Unsplash